mm264: FDA: Cloned animals okay to join the food chain

January 24, 2008

MUDGE’S Musings

52329_2ce671303e

Robert Brooks/Creative Commons licensed.

This nanocorner of the ‘Sphere© considers itself a friend to science, and a natural enemy of those who deny it.

In that vein we have discussed the topic of genetically modified foodstuffs a number of times in this space.

Battle Over Genetically Modified Foods

mm236: G.M. wine
mm233: Corn in the news
mm223: Pigs, bees, fish
mm198: GM foods – wrongheaded opposition
mm109: Too much of a good thing

But an editorial writer in NYTimes this week tackles the issue of cloned animals in the food chain, science that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration blessed last week, and makes some scientific sense.

nytimes

Closing the Barn Door After the Cows Have Gotten Out

By VERLYN KLINKENBORG | Published: January 23, 2008

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration cleared the way for the eventual sale of meat and dairy products from cloned animals, saying, in effect, that consumers face no health risks from them. The next day, the Department of Agriculture asked farmers to keep their cloned animals off the market until consumers have time to get over their anticloning prejudice. That is one prejudice I plan to hold on to. I will not be eating cloned meat.

The reason has nothing to do with my personal health or safety. I think the clearest way to understand the problem with cloning is to consider a broader question: Who benefits from it? Proponents will say that the consumer does, because we will get higher quality, more consistent foods from cloned animals. But the real beneficiaries are the nation’s large meatpacking companies — the kind that would like it best if chickens grew in the shape of nuggets. Anyone who really cares about food — its different tastes, textures and delights — is more interested in diversity than uniformity.

A felicitous turn of phrase: … “meatpacking companies – the kind that would like it best if chickens grew in the shape of nuggets.” Wow! Wish I could write like that!

Species diversity is a good thing, and cloning is its enemy.

[Please click the link below for the complete article — but then please come on back!]

Closing the Barn Door After the Cows Have Gotten Out – New York Times

The writer’s point is that seeds can be banked (and hurrah! for those heirloom tomatoes that seem to be landing in farmers markets and upscale food stores), but we apparently haven’t decided that “animal seeds,” i.e, their genetic material, are possible to harvest and save.

Heirloom prime rib, anyone?

It’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

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mm263: This man -so- wants to pull the trigger…

January 23, 2008

MUDGE’S Musings

bloomberg Now that we’re three weeks into 2008, and Blue Monday is behind us, we’re ready to once again consider the presidential prospects of New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Anyone stumbling more than once over this nanocorner of the ‘Sphere© will recall that Mayor Mike’s non-campaign has intrigued us for many months.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg of NYC for U.S. President 2008

mm024: Bloomberg?
mm038.1: Jews Sorta Like Bloomberg Even Though…
mm051: Bloomberg.com: Bloomberg’s Money, Visibility…
mm054: Chicago Tribune news: An Idea for Bloomberg
mm057: Bloomberg for President?
mm058: What Kind of President would Michael Bloomberg?
mm064: How to take down plutocrat Michael Bloomberg…
mm066: Michael Bloomberg’s Knightly Ambitions
mm069: The Votes Are In for New York’s Mayor Mike
mm086: Bloomberg Takes School Plan… to Midwest
mm110: Grading Mayoral Control
mm117: The cure for the Electoral College is worse…
mm208: Overdue a Bloomberg post
mm238: Bloomberg’s candidacy — closer to real?
mm248: Political Potpourri
mm254: Bloomberg – just won’t go away…

Faithful reader may further recall our R-word post of a few days ago. Paul Krugman was analyzing the Republican and Democratic candidates’ plans for dealing with our current increasingly dire economic distress. We commented that Krugman’s analysis left out a key player.

Can’t help but wonder what Michael Bloomberg thinks… Mike, Mr. self-made billionaire, what gets us out of our funk, fast?

Apparently, the mayor, or his people, were thinking along similar lines.

nytimes

Bloomberg Rips Federal Stimulus Package

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS | Published: January 23, 2008 | Filed at 7:37 p.m. ET

WASHINGTON (AP) — New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the White House and Congress on Wednesday are negotiating a shortsighted economic stimulus package after years of lousy financial management.

At an evening session of a meeting of the U.S. Council of Mayors in Washington, DC, Bloomberg laid into the administration’s proposal.

The billionaire mayor, who is said to be considering an independent presidential bid yet denies that he is a candidate, said the $150 billion stimulus package being hammered out between Democratic and Republican leaders won’t be enough.

The man knows his numbers; recall that starting from a good idea, he worked smart enough, and hard enough to become a billionaire.

”There’s just one problem: It’s not going to make much of a difference because we’ve already been running huge deficits,” Bloomberg said.

Some of those urging Bloomberg to run for president say his record as a CEO is his biggest selling point in a time of economic turmoil.

And, as MUDGE asked the other day, does he have a better plan in mind? Actually, yes.

[Please click the link below for the complete article — but then please come on back!]

Bloomberg Rips Federal Stimulus Package – New York Times

Makes sense, doesn’t it? A few hundred dollars of tax rebate isn’t going to save anyone’s house.

Makes sense, doesn’t it? Plan to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure for the long term, rather than playing political games with earmarks year to year.

Makes sense, doesn’t it? Ease immigration – get more motivated, vigorous workers into the country to help us work our way out of our economic funk (can’t grow by shrinking!).

As I hoped, on this issue, the man makes sense.

Your country needs you, Michael Bloomberg!

It’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

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mm262: Making the world better, one wall wart at a time

January 22, 2008

MUDGE’S Musings

It’s back! SASB©. Three recent looks at technology in today’s and tomorrow’s world.

shortattention_thumb2 ©

Wall wart? That’s the affectionate term for those transformers that power so many of today’s electronics. And even if we turn off the computer or the printer that’s plugged into one, if we leave the transformer in the wall, it’s drawing power and wasting energy.

But there are people out there with a better mousetrap – er, wall wart.

“We’re talking about the exact same principle as replacing incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent ones,” he said from Phoenix. “If our products were built into all consumer electronics — computers, flat-screen TVs, cellphones — we could save 800 million pounds of carbon emissions.”

Turns out that while we’ve been wringing our hands over greenhouse gases and energy wastefulness, technology has been pecking away at the issues.

In spite of ourselves, carbon emissions have only grown at half the speed of the growth of the world’s economy.

Now it’s a matter of having the will (and the capital) to apply the technology and start banking the benefits.

washingtonpost

A Big Drop In Emissions Is Possible With Today’s Technology

By Doug Struck | Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, January 21, 2008; Page A06

… Technological societies are constantly striving to create ways of doing things more efficiently. Advances in efficiency in the past 30 years have led carbon emissions to grow only half as fast as the world’s economy, according to Robert Socolow, a Princeton University engineer. But those savings have been offset by the rise in population and consumption.

From personal observation, we know the truth of the following:

On a broader scale, the mundane trappings of our modern life are becoming more efficient. Household appliances, including the thirstiest of them, furnaces and air-conditioners, have steadily diminished their energy consumption in the past three decades. Today’s new kitchen refrigerators, for example, use 70 percent less power than those made in the 1970s.

[Please click the link below for the complete article — but then please come on back!]

A Big Drop In Emissions Is Possible With Today’s Technology – washingtonpost.com

Compact fluorescent bulbs, which as it happens, are an interim technology (and I don’t know why this nanocorner of the ‘Sphere© didn’t give Philips Electronics LED lighting a story of its own!), are gradually replacing every conventional light bulb casa MUDGE, and in households nationwide. What did it take?

The government didn’t have to legislate for more efficient lighting – the marketplace did that.

Engineering the means to fit a fluorescent into the ubiquitous, decades-old incandescent bulb socket. Once over that hurdle, it was just a question of time, and Wal-Mart.

One would expect the same pattern to repeat where those dramatically improved efficient wall warts are concerned.

Creating efficient automobiles may require a more activist intervention – way overdue. But even for our personal transportation, the technology to improve efficiency and emissions may be close at hand.

shortattention_thumb2 ©

Maintaining for the moment our focus on bright electronics, we consider rear-projection televisions, powered by digital light processors (DLP).

nytimes

Betting on a Bright Future for Rear-Projection TVs

By ERIC A. TAUB | Published: January 21, 2008

PLANO, Tex. — Back in the early years of this decade, when plasma high-definition televisions cost $10,000, consumers found that buying a rear-projection TV was a more affordable way to jump into the digital era.

But with prices plummeting for liquid-crystal display and plasma TVs, the rear-projection market is quickly drying up. Sony and Philips got out of that business last month.

“The market is moving rapidly to L.C.D.,” said Todd Richardson, vice president for marketing of connected displays for Philips Consumer Lifestyle North America, a division of Royal Philips Electronics.

But Texas Instruments, the chip maker that developed the digital light processor most commonly found in most rear-projection TVs, is holding the line. It isn’t going to be easy.

Rear-projection TVs are getting thinner and brighter (just the opposite of yr (justifiably) humble svt, sorry to admit), and Texas Instruments is working on gamer friendly gimmicks like 3D to sweeten the pie.

Digital light processor technology uses up to two million microscopic tilting mirrors, all housed on a single chip, that direct light to the screen.

The technology, which was invented in 1987 by Larry Hornbeck, a T.I. engineer, has inherent advantages. Its TV sets weigh less than equivalent-size plasma displays. The sets can be frameless, increasing the size of the display that can fit into a given space. And D.L.P. sets consume less energy than plasma displays, an increasingly important factor as consumers opt for very large sets.

[Please click the link below for the complete article — but then please come on back!]

Betting on a Bright Future for Rear-Projection TVs – New York Times

On a related note, anyone else find those Texas Instrument DLP advertisements with that little girl (“it’s the mirrors”) just the slightest bit annoying, if not creepy?

shortattention_thumb2 ©

Our third technological exploration takes us to the wonderful world of Tim Harford, the “underground economist” whose columns are found in Slate and, in this case, Wired.

wired

How Email Brings You Closer to the Guy in the Next Cubicle

By Tim Harford | 01.18.08 | 6:00 PM

As a columnist (which is fancy for “journalist in jammies”), …

Savor that one… “journalist in jammies.” What we commentary bloggers aspire to, I suppose.

… I ought to personify the conventional wisdom that distance is dead: All I need to get my work done is a place to perch and a Wi-Fi signal. But if that’s true, why do I still live in London, the second-most expensive city in the world?

If distance really didn’t matter, rents in places like London, New York, Bangalore, and Shanghai would be converging with those in Hitchcock County, Nebraska (population 2,926 and falling). Yet, as far as we can tell through the noise of the real estate bust, they aren’t. Wharton real estate professor Joseph Gyourko talks instead of “superstar cities,” which have become the equivalent of luxury goods — highly coveted and ultra-expensive. If geography has died, nobody bothered to tell Hitchcock County.

Harford brings to light an astonishing paradox of our modern electronic collaborating world.

But I think the truth is more profound than either of those glib explanations: Technology makes it more fun and more profitable to live and work close to the people who matter most to your life and work. Harvard economist Ed Glaeser, an expert on city economies, argues that communications technology and face-to-face interactions are complements like salt and pepper, rather than substitutes like butter and margarine. Paradoxically, your cell phone, email, and Facebook networks are making it more attractive to meet people in the flesh.

Go figure.

He points out that, even as electronic communications have grown by orders of magnitude, air travel keeps growing (despite the Transportation Security Administration’s best efforts to persuade us to stay home and nest!).

Why?

[Please click the link below for the complete article — but then please come on back!]

How Email Brings You Closer to the Guy in the Next Cubicle

What a fascinating duality: electronic communications enhancing face to face communications.

No wonder the web conferencing technology I support and evangelize for has grown, while our corporate travel expense has grown even more. Thanks, Mr. Harford, for enlightening us!

And that’s SASB© for today. Email your friends all about it, then discuss it with them over coffee.

It’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

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mm261: 21-January-2008: Blue Monday

January 21, 2008

MUDGE’S Musings

louisxvi

Louis XVI of France was executed 21-January-1793.

lenin Wikipedia

Vladimir Ilych Lenin, first leader and principal architect of the Soviet Union, died 21-January-1924.

hiss Wikipedia

History.com tells us that Alger Hiss was convicted as a spy of the Soviet Union on 21-January-1950. For you kids, check out the Wikipedia article — this case was controversial my entire life.

Further depressing anniversary from History.com. On 21-January-1916:

The National Board of Review, founded in 1909 as the National Board of Censorship, agrees it will not accept nudity in films. The board, a volunteer group of film fans representing movie studios, served as an industry watchdog to help studios avoid government censorship….

jimmiecarterWikipedia

Okay, let’s cheer up. Let’s remember Viet Nam and Jimmy Carter. The day after his inauguration, History.com tells us:

On this day in 1977, U.S. President Jimmy Carter grants an unconditional pardon to hundreds of thousands of men who evaded the draft during the Vietnam War.

In total, some 100,000 young Americans went abroad in the late 1960s and early 70s to avoid serving in the war. Ninety percent went to Canada, where after some initial controversy they were eventually welcomed as immigrants.

Never had heard this before today, but the third Monday of January is reckoned to be the most depressing day of the year.

Okay, we need to balance this out. How about this? Who was born on 21-January?

Found a couple of websites that feature this type of information. The most comprehensive is a site called Gregsite, from Greg Duncan. Most of the following information comes from the 21-January page.

Happy Birthday! to…

1338 Charles V (the Wise), king of France (1364-80)

A little obscure, that. Can you give us something more relevant?

How about an inventor, a pioneer, and a couple of Confederate generals, including THE Confederate general?

1743 John Fitch, inventor (had a working steamboat years before Fulton)

1813 John C Fremont, [Pathfinder], map maker/explorer (western US)/Gov (AZ)

1821 John Cabell Breckinridge, (D) 14th US VP (1857-61)/mjr-gen (Confed)

1824 Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson, Lt Gen 2nd Corps (ANV, Confed)

stonewalljackson Wikipedia

A composer I’ve heard of, and a weapons designer:

1855 Ernest Chausson, Paris, composer (Poeme for Violin & Orchestra)

1855 John M Browning, US, weapons manufacturer

An actor from the old days, probably more disappointed than we are about that 1916 ruling:

jcarrollnaish Wikipedia

1897 J Carrol Naish, NYC, actor (Charlie Chan-Adv of Charlie Chan)

Assorted people you may have heard of:

1905 Christian Dior, Normandy France, fashion designer (long-skirted look)

1922 Paul Scofield, British actor (Man for All Seasons, Train)

1924 Benny Hill, Southampton England, comedian (Benny Hill Show)

bennyhillWikipedia

Benny Hill. [“I was named after good Queen Victoria!” “Not too long afterward, either.”] Who knew?

1924 Telly Savalas, Garden City NJ, actor (Acapulco, Kojak)

1926 Steve Reeves, Montana, actor (Hercules, Hercules Unchained)

1939 Wolfman Jack, [Bob Smith], Bkln NY, DJ (Midnight Special)

1940 Jack Nicklaus, Columbus Ohio, golfer (Player of Yr 1967,72,73,75,76)

1941 Edwin Starr, rocker

1941 Placido Domingo, Madrid Spain, opera tenor (Pinkerton-Mme Butterfly)

placidodomingoWikipedia

Quiet Sunday, one of the Three Tenors (with José Carreras and the late Luciano Pavoratti), but so much more.

1941 Richie Havens, Bkln, folk singer (Here Comes the Sun)

1942 Mac Davis, Lubbock Tx, singer/actor (Mac Davis Show, North Dallas 40)

1947 Jill Eikenberry, New Haven Ct, (Ann Kelsey-LA Law, Manhattan Project)

1948 Yr (justifiably) humble svt, aka “MUDGE” Chicago, IL, Blogger (Left-Handed Complement)

1950 Billy Ocean, Trinidad, singer (Suddenly, Caribbean Queen)

1957 Geena [Virginia] Davis, Wareham Mass, actress (Beetlejuice, Fly)

geenadavisWikipedia

Geena Davis. Sigh.

1961 Gabrielle Carteris, Phoenix Az, actress (Andrea-Beverly Hills 90210)

Hell of a day. This year, more than most.

It’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

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mm260: The other oil shock

January 20, 2008

MUDGE’S Musings

We’ve had several occasions in this nanocorner of the ‘Sphere©

Fuel from Food: Just a bad idea all around

mm233: Corn in the news – and not just in Iowa!
mm194: Friedman: Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda
mm193: Fuel without oil, or corn
mm084: Food versus fools – Salon.com
mm053: The case for turning crops into fuel – Saletan
mm015: Welcomed back to the guild

…to consider the growth of the use of traditional food crops to create alternative fuel stocks – ethanol from corn is the U.S. wrongheaded approach.

Such is the triumph of our interconnected world that bad ideas from the U.S. are reproduced just as predictably as are many of our other famous cultural artifacts: rock and roll, blue jeans, cellular telephones.

January 19th’s NYTimes brings to our attention the food crisis in Asia caused by conversion of food crops to petroleum substitutes.

nytimes

A New, Global Oil Quandary: Costly Fuel Means Costly Calories

By KEITH BRADSHER | Published: January 19, 2008

KUANTAN, Malaysia — Rising prices for cooking oil are forcing residents of Asia’s largest slum, in Mumbai, India, to ration every drop. Bakeries in the United States are fretting over higher shortening costs. And here in Malaysia, brand-new factories built to convert vegetable oil into diesel sit idle, their owners unable to afford the raw material.

Cooking oil? A cheap commodity in the west. What’s the big deal?

Cooking oil may seem a trifling expense in the West. But in the developing world, cooking oil is an important source of calories and represents one of the biggest cash outlays for poor families, which grow much of their own food but have to buy oil in which to cook it.

The focus of this story is on palm oil, until recently rather disreputable nutritionally here, but back in favor as an option to trans fats, increasingly seen as unhealthy, and even legislated against in trendy places like New York City.

Now, everyone everywhere wants palm oil. But as petroleum prices rise, and vegetable based oils are viewed as attractive components of biodiesel, palm oil is suddenly in short supply, and skyrocketing in price.

[Please click the link below for the complete article — but then please come on back!]

An Oil Quandary: Costly Fuel Means Costly Calories – New York Times

The interconnectedness of the world never fails to astonish. In this instance, the result isn’t merely inconveniently high prices for traditionally low-cost commodities, it’s starvation in Asian slums.

Stranger yet the instructive example of the palm oil refinery in Malaysia, built alongside sizable palm forests, prepared to convert palm oil to biodiesel. Now frantically attempting to come up with a new plan, as its machinery was idled because the demand for palm oil as food has ratcheted up its price beyond economical use as a feedstock for mere fuel.

In the rush to pander to Midwest growers of corn and soybeans by subsidizing the use of ethanol for fuel; in the rush to protect U.S. citizens from the unhealthy effects of oil their potatoes are fried in; we initiate chains of events that results in a crisis of shortages and starvation on the other side of the globe.

Farmers, always the hardest working and often the least compensated link of the food chain, naturally seek to get the highest price possible for their output, and biofuel has supercharged demand, thus prices are higher.

Seems clear that in the rush to embrace biofuels the law of unintended consequences has landed square into the battered cooking pots of Mumbai.

Can’t cook the week’s scrap of mutton with unintended consequences.

It’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

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mm259: Nomination

January 19, 2008

MUDGE’S Musings

It’s in the air, right?

Just finished nominating our favorite blogging host, WordPress.com to the Webware 100 2008 awards.

webware100 Nominated WordPress.com in two categories, the obvious, Publishing and photography, and also the less obvious category, Social.

Nominations continue until January 25.

This was a no-brainer (just as well, I know); WordPress.com is a wonderful service that … okay, here’s what my two-sentence (that’s the rules, folks — if I want to say more, that’s what WordPress.com is for!) nomination stated:

WordPress.com hosts free of charge (for most) over 2,100,000 blogs, smoothly providing state of the art technology, awesome (it’s free, right?) reliability and brilliant, cheerful customer service. The very model of a modern web “better mousetrap” that also has grown into a unique global community of writers.

Yeah, when MUDGE gushes, the tub overflows. They’ll toss me out of the Curmudgeon’s Guild for sure. But, this is sincere.

I embraced this Web 2.0 adventure the world calls blogging seriously only last May. 275 or so posts later, Left-Handed Complement remains a force for good in a life that turns out was waiting forever for the opportunity and venue to write.

Thanks, faithful reader, for faithfully reading.

It’s satisfying also to have made the jump from voracious web content consumer (for 15 or more years!) to provider of content, even if confined to this nanocorner of the ‘Sphere©.

And, entry into the social world of blogging that has become a fascinating destination in and of itself, threatening at times to swamp the time destined for writing.

wordpress1 As I’ve written consistently through the months (some of the more recent: here, here, here and speaking especially about the social networking element here), WordPress.com has provided the means to effortlessly exercise insufficiently used writing muscles, with little technical muss or fuss.

And, as a professional IT person, I know full well that only ferociously creative effort behind the scenes keeps it so simple and reliable where our rubber meets the road.

When the Webware 100 voting begins in February, and WordPress.com is indeed on the list of nominees, yr (justifiably) humble svt will operate in typical Chicago election fashion: voting early and often.

It’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

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mm258: It’s the economy, stupid!

January 18, 2008

MUDGE’S Musings

Can’t escape it.

Oil at $100 per barrel. And planted well over $3 per gallon at the pump.

Stock market with more bad news than good.

Another bank lost $billions last quarter, due to the mortgage fiasco that is shortening breath and whose ripples are washing ashore around the world. A bank in England with the oh so modern name of Northern Rock caused the first run on a British bank in 200 years last fall and had to be bailed out by Her Majesty’s government; U.S. subprime mortgages the cause. How unseemly!

How do you feel about your job? More and more entry level positions in MUDGE’s IT field have “right sourced” (love those euphemisms) themselves to Bengaluru and environs; where do they (the suited euphemizers in the corner offices) think that their own successors will come from? What, me worry?

A presidential election that for more than a year seemed so much a referendum on the Republican party’s mishandling of Iraq has, as elections often do, and as this preposterously lengthy election season guaranteed, morphed into another arena altogether.

It’s the economy, stupid!

Fred Siegel points this out in the latest City Journal.

cityjournal-new

Fred Siegel

The Globalization Election

Voters are showing their anxiety about the economy and immigration.

10 January 2008

The common thread that ties Mike Huckabee’s come-from-almost-nowhere victory in Iowa to Hillary Clinton’s unexpected resurgence in New Hampshire is a shared ability to speak to widespread middle- and lower-middle-class economic anxiety. In Iowa, Huckabee effectively disparaged Mitt Romney—who made a fortune at Bain Capital and outspent him 20 to 1—as someone who couldn’t possibly understand “people at the lower ends of the economic scale,” who fear that they’re losing ground in the increasingly globalized economy. And in New Hampshire, while Barack Obama’s rhetorical flourishes spoke most effectively to the young and to the “creative class” that has flourished in the global economy, Clinton—like her husband before her—felt the middle class’s pain, devoting most of her campaign events to highlighting economic issues and offering narrowly tailored programs to address everything from the rising cost of tuition to mortgage defaults. And it paid off: she defeated Obama by ten points among those who felt they were falling behind financially.

Clinton’s comeback aside, the most surprising fact to emerge from New Hampshire was that voters in both parties named the economy as the Number One issue. New Hampshire, where more than 81 percent of the voters have at least some college education, is prosperous by any standard. It enjoys the lowest poverty rate in the country, one of the lowest unemployment and taxation rates, and is in the top echelon of income. Yet only 14 percent of its Democrats and half of its Republicans believe that the economy is doing well, while a stunning 98 percent of voters in the Democratic primary and 80 percent in the Republican primary were “worried” or “very worried” about the economy.

Siegel has very perceptively connected our economic (skyrocketing oil, plummeting home values) shpilkes with the issue of illegal immigration, tosses in terrorism, and calls it the globalization election.

[Please click the link below for the complete article — but then please come on back!]

The Globalization Election by Fred Siegel, City Journal 10 January 2008

In the end (290 days and a couple of hours from now) it will come down to which of the smooth (or not) talkers convince the voters that s/he understands the gravity of the issue Siegel calls “globalization” and has a plan to make all of our troubles vanish.

For all the talking we’ve heard, I don’t think any one of the candidates has convinced enough of us.

It will be an interesting 290 days…

It’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

Faithful reader might be interested in how MUDGE came up with that 290 day number.

Got to the second page of Google results before the answer popped up – a site I’ve depended on for years.

Global as yr (justifiably) humble svt is, accurately knowing what time it will be in Sydney when it’s 7:00pmCST next week is part of the job. Long years ago, I came to depend on a terrific website, timeanddate.com to accurately deliver that information. On its Personalized World Clock page, one can specify up to 25 cities around the world, and you get a page that displays them. As I write this, it’s 5:58pm Friday in Honolulu, 1:58am Saturday in Sao Paulo, 11:58am Saturday in Beijing, and 2:58pm Saturday in aforementioned Sydney. Very cool.

Well, the site also has many other useful calculators. And, doh!, a days between two dates calculator. Also very cool.

And, a theme we’ve used here before, it’s only 31,795,200 seconds, give or take a few thousand, until a new president is inaugurated.

Can’t come soon enough.

Really, now, it’s it for now. Thanks,

–MUDGE

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